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Around 50 people were spoken to at various locations and given guidance around issues of modern slavery and workers’ rights

around 50 people were spoken to at various locations and given guidance around issues of modern slavery and workers rights
around 50 people were spoken to at various locations and given guidance around issues of modern slavery and workers rights

 

Kent Police and partner agencies have visited nail bars, car washes and barber shops in Dover during a day of raising awareness about modern slavery.

 

Officers from the town’s Community Safety Unit worked with representatives of Dover District Council, Home Office Immigration Enforcement and the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority on Tuesday 29 September 2020.

 

They spoke to workers and managers at sites around Dover, to ensure legal guidelines and workers’ rights were being properly followed.

 

Those spoken to were provided with advice on human trafficking and modern slavery and were given the opportunity to speak to officials in a safe space.

 

Three people suspected of working illegally were identified and their cases will now be examined by Immigration Enforcement.

 

Inspector Fred McCormack, of Dover’s Community Safety Unit, said: ‘Around 50 people were spoken to at various locations and given guidance around issues of modern slavery and workers’ rights.

 

Kent Police is determined to protect the most vulnerable in our society and will be repeating similar activities on a regular basis to help build up our intelligence picture, take enforcement action if appropriate and gain the trust of potential victims.’

 

Cllr Nigel Collor, Dover District Council’s cabinet member for community, said: ‘This was an excellent example of partnership working to help support an often hidden part of the community.

 

‘From the briefing at DDC’s offices, support from our new CCTV control room, through to multi-agency visits to premises across the district, we demonstrated that we have the resources to protect workers who may be vulnerable to exploitation.’